Jeronimo Voss

Phantasmagorical-Horizon-installation-view
Phantasmagorical Horizon (2013), single channel video, 15:00 min

 

Phantasmagorical-Horizon,-2013-video-still-2
Phantasmagorical Horizon (2013), single channel video, 15:00 min

 

Phantasmagorical-Horizon,-2013-video-still-6
Phantasmagorical Horizon (2013), single channel video, 15:00 min

 

Phantasmagorical-Horizon,-2013-video-still-8
Phantasmagorical Horizon (2013), single channel video, 15:00 min

 
Phantasmagorical Horizon (2013) by Jeronimo Voss refers to the Laterna Magica projections onto smoke or moving clothes. To be found at fairs after the french revolution these projections were featuring ghostly imagery of revolutionaries such as Danton, Marat or Robespierre. Voss’ movie starts out with an interview about the phantasmagorical theatre of the 18th century to further develop into a montage of todays glass and transparent architecture, that represents post-modern design as an expression of late-capitalism.

 

Allan Sekula

Allan-Sekula-Containershipday

The Forgotten Space, Documentary, 112 min, 2010 with Noel Burch (film still)

 

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The Forgotten Space, (photography)

 

Allan-Sekula-Empty-cargo-ship

The Forgotten Space, Documentary, 112 min, 2010 with Noel Burch (film still)

 

forgottenspace09

The Forgotten Space, (photography)

Allan Sekula (1951–2013) is one of the few openly Marxist American artists. In his photographic and film work he researched the policies of depicting class and class struggle, labour and exploitation and the distribution of commodities. From that point is makes sense that he and his long-term collaborator Noel Burch have created a documentary (but wait, no… it is not a documentary) film The Forgotten Space to track the trans-national logistics and production logics of globalized capitalism as well as work force, and the worker’s individual stories, behind it. Sekula and Burch thus try to intertwine the depiction of two abstract entities that usually resist depiction – work and capital.

 

 

 

 

 

The Buried Alive Group

 

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Animation Chant for a Hybrid, featuring Igor Krutogolov and Lucy Dubinchik, (Screenshot) 2008

 

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Animation Chant for a Hybrid, featuring Igor Krutogolov and Lucy Dubinchik, (Screenshot) 2008

 

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Animation Chant for a Little Iron, featuring Igor Krutogolov and Lucy Dubinchik, (Screenshot) 2009

 

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Animation Chant for a Little Iron, featuring Igor Krutogolov and Lucy Dubinchik, (Screenshot) 2009

 

I can not help myself but interpret The Buried Alive Group’s Animation Chants as a comment on commodity fetishism. And I have to admit that never before I have seen such a humorous but pinpointed artistic reflection on how (most of) our thinking is structured through the exchange of commodities and money. While the Hybrid Chant is more of a shamanic group driven kind, in Animation Chant for a Little Iron we see two people at their kitchen desk singing a partly modernist chant for the iron before them. In the words of The Buried Alive Group:

“Your wire is your handsome tail, finely dotted white on black, But it is also your leash,
an umbilical chord, tying you to the wall and to your energy supply.
Your metallic nose is pointed and can be a mighty weapon, able skulls to crack
May it soon succeed to to smell, to smile, and lead you forward, upwards, to the sky!

Wake up, little iron
Live and Love, little iron
Move about little iron,
Please try, little iron.”

 

 

 

Erik van der Weijde

Van der Weyde – Oscar Niemeyer

Van der Weyde – Oscar Niemeyer

Van der Weyde – Oscar Niemeyer

Van der Weyde – Oscar Niemeyer

Van der Weyde – Oscar Niemeyer

Van der Weyde – Oscar Niemeyer

Erik van der Weijde: O. Niemeyer (book, 25 x 18,5 cm, offset, hard cover, 2012)

 

Artists Statement: “Van der Weijde travelled to cities like Brasilia, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Paris, Milan, Berlin and many others to photograph the architecture of Oscar Niemeyer. Once more, the obsession with his subject, has led the artist to produce an archive presented in a book in an oblong format. This reprint has been designed around a hard-, white faux leather, cover, conceived by Urs Lehni.” http://erikvanderweijde.com/

 

 

Tina Modotti

Tina Modotti

Sickle, Bandolier and Corn (Mexico City, 1928)

 

Tina Modotti - Woman with Flag
Women with Flag (Mexico City, 1928)

 

Tina Modotti, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera march with artists syndicate on May 1, (Mexico City, 1929)

 

Tina Modotti

Stadium, Mexico City (Mexico City, ca. 1927)

 

It is difficult to sum up Tina Modottis rich and complex life into a few sentences, but surely she was one of the artists who most openly connected their artistic work with their communist beliefs. Her life and death mirrors the being thrown around that many communists of her time experienced, not only between the locations that became stations of her life (Mexico, Spain, Soviet Union, Mexico) but also the large spread that the communist idea spans between Anarchism and Stalinism.

 

 

 

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